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(AEA/AFTRA/SDC/SAG)

Josh is a critically acclaimed performance artist, actor, and director. Last seen as Biff, in Death Of Salesman. Some notable professional roles include: Porolles, in “All’s Well That Ends Well”. Gratiano, in “Merchant of Venice”. Grumio, in “Taming of The Shrew”, Agent Fairchild in “Boise, USA”, and The Rogue in “The Sophisticated Rogue”. On camera, he’s the creator, executive producer, and host of Showtime’s: “Lock ‘N Load“; as well as Spike TVs “The Sales King”. He is currently in multiple development of media & stage content. He is a founding member of the 1992 award winning avant-garde theatre, ZJU. Josh offers private one on one coaching and has been a vetern sales consultant for many years. (www.joshtryan.com)

JoshT.Ryansb     Podcast Projects,  coming back soon.

 

Josh will be a guest artist at his alumni universtity this fall in SFB for two weekends at the end of October. If you get the chance come out for his return to the stage.

 

Watch

The Sophisticated Rogue has closed, thank you William Norrett and the fantastic cast. (WINTER: Now Closed)

Attack of the Rotting Corpses Golden Edition closed in triumph, thank you to all who came. (WINTER: Now Closed)

Othello, thank you cast and audience for making this a true glam event. (WINTER: Now Closed) (Huffington Post)

Morrison Christmas, inspired by the Liberation Through Hearing During The Intermediate State, or Bardo Tordrol, The Lizard King, and the psychedelic Blue Light Distraction of Christmas Ensemble. Conceived and directed by critically acclaimed performance artist, Josh T. Ryan. Bringing together artists in honor of the traditions of The Living Theatre, The Open Theatre, and Peter Brook. (Closed) (StageRaw)

Notes From Underground, Backstage, LAWEEKLY

The Last Days Of Judas Iscariot, winner of Two LAWEEKLY Theatre Awards, LATIMES, LAWEEKLY, EYESPYLA 

BLOOD OF MACBETH, Broadway World, KCRW, LAWEEKLY

DEEP BLACK SLUDGE

Josh T. Ryan’s One Man Show, reviewed again. Thanks to the LA TIMES, Back Stage, LA WEEKLY, & Review Plays:

The capacity crowd anxiously waited as the de rigueur five minute late curtain extended to ten minutes, and when the lights went black and the music began its loud throbbing, the crowd erupted with expectation.  They were not disappointed. Josh T. Ryan appears doing a Fonz, slowly combing his hair; but not just combing the hair – loving – caressing – worshipping the hair with his comb as he moves from one part of the stage area to the other. Ordinarily a man combing his hair is no big deal.

But this is Josh T. Ryan, who’s so intense he can reduce anyone to tears just by reading the phone book.  This is the Ryan of a thousand faces – of a plethora of expressions – of a million moves.  To say that this is a one man show would be a gross understatement.  It’s more like a show of dozens of men with one man doing all the parts.  So when Josh combs his hair there is an uncommon artistry and expression, and a deconstruction of the action that lets the audience explore the minute intricacies of one of the most common acts, and gives us an inside glimpse of puffery and arrogance at their best.

The only connection (that we know of) between the seventeen tabloids offered, is that the audience howls with laughter every time.  Other than that, the Colonel Saito from the Bridge on The River Kwai, is just as compelling and comic as the Chicken Boy, or the rude Irish lad who can’t pronounce “rude”, but all the characters are about as different from each other as the Jamaican Bob Sled team is to the Austrian Limbo dancers.

When Josh tells his Scary Story, his story is really scary, and when he shows a White Boy breaking it down, you know this man is a genius in progress.  The title piece was the most poignant as it shows actual photos of Josh as a baby through his teen years, but the closing Sip of Lemonade was one of the funniest.

The number of people who do a one person show keeps growing, but the number who can do it with intelligence, style and creativity and still deliver a meaningful message is dwindling.  Put Josh T. Ryan at the head of this elite line, for he is one of the few who sees the little human foibles and turns the mirror back so we can see their absurdity.  His sarcasm is biting and his jabs poke deep, sometimes too uncomfortably, but always wrapped in humor so no matter how piercing, there is a comforting message that there are many people just as zany and that there is a way out – no matter how deep and black the sludge.  That’s something one can laugh about.
– Backstage

 

Press Release

“Josh works a restrained rockabilly look, with statement sideburns and chain wallet. His chunky belt buckle conceals an ultra-compact pistol. Josh is a loud talker but a good listener and very highly Red Bull’d. He displays the fast-adapting charm of an ace salesman, dishing out hip-hop slang to youngsters, Eagle Scout diligence to military types, historical knowledge to the collectors, Hebrew to the orthodox Jews, and flirtation to the grannies. He strikes just the right gangster-leaning pose in attending to the youngsters who come in wearing T-shirts depicting Al Pacino as Tony Montana in Scarface. (Such clothing might be appropriate attire for a mid-level coke deal, but in the context of a legitimate gun shop, it just looks gauche.) “It’s just like working in a bar,” Josh says, referring to the essential part of the job in which he tends to his patrons’ desire to make small talk, share anecdotes, and express feelings of mortal terror…. This is one of America’s top salesman…” -The Slate.com

“Lock ‘N Load stars an amiable salesman named Josh T. Ryan. He’s a gun enthusiast himself, but more to the point, he’s an actor, complete with slicked-back Elvis hair, a background doing Shakespeare, a radio-talk-show-host’s demeanor, and an executive producing credit on this show. Selling guns, we’re told, is the job he’s taken to pay the bills, and he does it with TV-ready panache in this sprawling store with a shooting range in the basement. Ryan clearly knows his merchandise – from time to time, we see him shoot with his customers at an outdoor firing range – but he functions here more as an interviewer, part journalist and part therapist, drawing his customers out on the subject of why they want their heat.”
-The Boston Globe

“Ryan could probably sell one (GUN) to me, and that ends up making the show way more entertaining than it has any right to be.”- AV Club

“Ryan stands behind the counter, always loaded with at least one good punch line for his customers”. – PajamasMedia.com

What the critics say about Josh T. Ryan as a stage artist..

“It’s as if Sid Vicious suddenly became a Trapist Monk…”

- Backstage

What the critics say about Josh T. Ryan as a stage artist..

“director Josh T. Ryan has managed a neat trick, he actually unearthed considerable humor in Dostoevsky’s subterranean work…Josh T. Ryan approaches his subject with near-surreal archness, a frenetic tack that is hysterical in every sense of the word…”

- Los Angeles Times

What the critics say about Josh T. Ryan as a stage artist..

“Josh T. Ryan is a gifted comedic actor, a postmodern Red Skelton who uses gesture and physicality to convey the core of character.”

- Backstage

What the critics say about Josh T. Ryan as a stage artist..

“Josh T. Ryan ably translates Dostoevsky’s verbose psychological study into a surprisingly visual evening.”

- L.A. Weekly

What the critics say about Josh T. Ryan as a stage artist..

“The fire sign theatre-flavored finale, “Divorce”, benefits from director Josh T. Ryan and Rainey K. Taylor, hilarious as an ex-power couple in caustic reunion at their problem child’s boarding school.”

- Los Angeles Times

What the critics say about Josh T. Ryan as a stage artist..

“Josh T. Ryan is priceless as the swaggering Rogue; whether calculating how many 5-year-olds he can beat up or recounting his exploits on the streets of the concrete jungle, he perfectly captures the spirit of bygone literary heroics.”

- Backstage

What the critics say about Josh T. Ryan as a stage artist..

“Josh T. Ryan is enormously appealing and suitably scary as the beleaguered painter with no legitimate way out of his addictions.”

- Backstage

What the critics say about Josh T. Ryan as a stage artist..

“Josh T. Ryan is marvelously off beat…”

- LA Weekly

What the critics say about Josh T. Ryan as a stage artist..

“In the original film, it was actor Henry Silva who scared the sheets out of them, and here Josh T. Ryan outdoes Silva as a chilling, ruthless villain who would just as soon shoot you up with a needle or a gun.”

- Jose Ruiz, Review Plays

What the critics say about Josh T. Ryan as a stage artist..

“Big impression on me was Josh T. Ryan in the role of the FBI guy. Italian New Yorker through and through, Unbelievable!”

- Goldstar

What the critics say about Josh T. Ryan as a stage artist..

“Josh T. Ryan infuses the Rogue with an almost Chaplinesque romance, with demure aristocracy, a twirling cane and an intellectual voice.”

- Jose Ruiz, Review Plays